Stress, Social Support, and Mindfulness in Parents of Children with Neurodevelopmental Deficits: A Quantitative Analysis

Research Study

Organization: Walden University

Contact: Branden Syrotchen, branden.syrotchen@waldenu.edu

Description:

Research supports that the parenting of children with neurodevelopmental deficits can be very stressful to the point of increased health risks, which can detrimentally affect parents physical and emotional well-being. Considerable research within this area is focused on the high stress levels of caregiving. However, less is understood on how parental traits and habits affect their stress levels, and what specific intervention types could best help minimize stress in this cohort group. Population specific research is vital for the development of empirically supported treatments, which then can be used by professionals and paraprofessional in treatment planning, family therapy, and psychoeducational purposes. This proposed cross-sectional study that is guided by the theory of Self-Determination, which proposes to tease out intention, by classifying parental acts in a range, of being more internal or externally derived. This proposed study seeks to understand how the stress levels of parents with children diagnosed with neurodevelopmental deficits, are affected by their level of baseline mindfulness, social support, and possible interaction effect of these two variables. A proposed convenience sample of 72 will be sought from online support groups and Facebook users that meet the requirements of the proposed study. Descriptive statistics will summarize demographic data obtained from the survey, and multiple regression will be used to analyze data received from the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale and the Family Support Scale, and its relationship to data received from the Parent Stress Scale. This proposed study would help promote positive social change by aiding in population specific data, which could be used in program development, psychoeducational training, and family therapy specifically towards this population group.