Autism study at the University of Maryland in College Park

Article

We are recruiting children between the ages of 7 to 12 who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder in the greater Washington, D.C. area.
Our study explores the development of children who have autism, particularly during social interaction. Participating in these studies may help advance autism research, treatment, and intervention. Kids that have participated in the past have found our studies to be interesting, educational and fun!
The study involves four two-hour visits. You will receive up to $40 for each session, for a potential total of $160, and your child will receive a toy prize for participation after each session.
1. During the first visit, your child will complete the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) assessment. It is used to aid in the diagnosis and characterization of autism, though it does not clinically confirm the diagnosis on its own. You may receive a brief report from this assessment upon request.
2. The next visit is a behavioral session, during which your child will play some games, answer questions about themselves and watch some videos.
3. The last two visits involve a fMRI scan. The fMRI is safe and does not emit any radiation. Your child will play games while in the scanner and we will record their brain activity. We want to provide practice time, snacks, and bathroom breaks, and ensure that your child feels comfortable with the process; thus, although this visit is two-hours long, the scan itself will only be about 45 minutes.
Though this study involves four visits, we are very flexible with our hours and can accommodate to nearly any schedule.

If you are interested in participating, the next step would be to schedule a time to talk over the phone and go over some screening materials to make sure your child is eligible. You can contact us at our email (marylandbrainstudy@gmail.com) or at our phone number 301-405-7612. Or let us know that you’re interested at our survey link: http://tinyurl.com/MarylandBrainStudy