Billy The Kid

by admin

Billy The Kid is the story of a teenager with Asperger’s Syndrome from a small working class town in Maine.  This documentary follows Billy as he navigates life, trying to mesh together his ideas of the world and its workings and the reality of it all.  Billy shows the audience the way love, relationships, and daily life are viewed by someone with AS and invites the viewers to suspend thier ideas of the “real world” and really experience something different.  It is surprising how much a neurotypical person can relate to the individual situations Billy finds himself in throughout this film.

Billy The Kid Documentary

Billy The Kid Documentary

AANE has a special relationship with Jennifer Venditti.  After discovering this film AANE and Jennifer collaborated to put together a screening event at the Coolidge Corner Theater.  It was a wonderful event that attracted those with AS, those wanting to learn more and proffesionals who work with individuals with AS.  This diverse crowd found that the topics and ideas being conveyed were important and accessible to all who watched.

Recently released on DVD, Billy The Kid is now available from the film’s official web site along with other information, reviews, etc.

November 10, 2008       Posted in: AS Community & Culture
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One Response

  1. Dantesi - October 8, 2015

    I know you know that I can’t diagnose or treat plpoee here in the blogosphere. In fact, I’ve taken myself out of pediatric practice because of my illness. Of course I can’t help thinking about medical stuff and having my own private thoughts about it, but my public practice has been shut down for ten years.The main thing is not so much pinning down a DSM diagnosis with kids. It’s paying proper attention to their needs. If you haven’t had him evaluated by a university based multidisciplinary clinic, do so. They look at things like spacial integration, balance and coordination, visual fields, audiology, all these sensory-motor factors that make such a huge difference in whether a kid feels like they’re really here or not. A kid with sensory-motor integration problems might have screaming fits just because they have sensations that don’t make any sense to them, and it freaks them out. Think of Temple Grandin’s squeeze machine (if you haven’t read Thinking in Pictures, you should). In my university’s program for autistic spectrum kids, they had a brilliant therapist who would catch a kid before he spun out of control and roll him up in a yoga mat type thing. The kid felt safe, enclosed, and his squeeze receptors got squeezed, and he calmed down. Now tell me why these kids don’t like to be hugged, but they love to be rolled up in a rug??? I can’t tell you how many hours I spent bear-hugging my son when he was very young while he raged, screamed, kicked, tried to bite, head-butted, and fought like the devil. When he calmed down I would carry him to his room and set him on his bed, telling him he could come out of his room when he felt human. Then he would tear apart his room, throwing every single thing on the floor. I had a blow-up clown that he could pummel, and he did. Then, after the storm had passed, it would get very quiet in his room. I’d hear the door open. Mama? I’m human now. Can I come out? And I’d go and help him put his room back together, and we’d go do something completely different like make lunch or go for a walk. This happened about three times a week. Now he’s a doctoral student in Medicinal Chemistry. You just have to hang in there with them and try to get them what they need, and never give up being their advocate. And love them. A lot.

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